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New research to compare hospital volunteering in the UK and Canada

We're delighted to announce that IVR will be working with researchers from the University of Toronto to undertake a piece of work examining the role of volunteering in helping patients in their transition back to their home. A researcher from Canada will be visiting us later in the year, but if you’d like to know more, have examples you’d like to share, or potentially would be keen to get involved as a case study, please either email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Youth leadership and employability: new research briefing available

A new research briefing exploring the potential of leadership programmes in boosting the employability skills of young people is now available.

The research draws on findings from the first year of an evaluation looking at the impact of the Asda Active Sports Leaders programme, a three year initiative, delivered in partnership between Sports Leaders UK, Asda, Spirit of 2012 and ukactive, which aims to create long lasting behavioural change in favour of greater physical activity, specifically in young people.

Those young people completing Sports Leaders UK courses (which include a certain number of volunteering hours) identified positive changes in their confidence and development of ‘employability skills’, including communication and team work. The briefing highlights the need for sports leadership programmes to provide learners with practical real life experiences of leadership, and opportunities for learners to reflect on their learning as well as the need to engage with employers in programme development.

 

New training session on how to assess the impact of your volunteers 24 February

Date: 24 February 2016
Time: 9.30 – 16.30
Location: Manchester, M1 3HF

We recently launched the third edition of the Volunteering Impact Assessment Toolkit (VIAT) which can help you measure and demonstrate the impact of volunteering. 

This new training event will help equip you with the skills and confidence to use the toolkit in your own organisation. 

The workshop will give you step-by-step guidance on how to use the VIAT to assess the impact your volunteers are having on your organisation, your beneficiaries, and themselves, as well as on the wider community and other stakeholders. 

Book your place

   

Community Life survey figures for 2014-15 show unchanged rates of formal volunteering

Tuesday, 21 July 2015

Today saw the release of the latest figures from the Community Life survey for 2014-15. During this time:

  • 42% of people questioned reported volunteering formally (ie through a group, club or organisation) at least once in the previous year.
  • 27% said they took part at least once a month (‘regular volunteers’).

There has been no significant change from last year’s Community Life survey results (for the period August 2013 to April 2014) which were 41% and 27% respectively.

Not all changes in figures are statistically significant – sometimes the changes can be small, which may mean that we cannot say with confidence that it is an actual, statistical change, rather than possible error.

Find out more in our volunteering stats pages.

 

New edition of impact toolkit launched

The fully updated third edition of the Volunteering Impact Assessment Toolkit is now available.

The toolkit provides practical guidance to help organisations measure the impact of volunteering and can be used by any sized organisation. The printed handbook provides step-by-step guidance for doing a volunteering impact assessment and can help you assess the impact of volunteering on volunteers, staff, beneficiaries/service users and the wider community.

The accompanying resource pack includes downloadable tools such as questionnaires and topic guides which can be adapted to suit your organisation and needs.

Buy the toolkit

   

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